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Full text of "NightRider"

there blowing through his powerful-looking yellow teeth and
fanning himself with his hat.

The meeting was what he could have predicted, Mr. Munn
decided, if he had taken the trouble to speculate about it
beforehand. Mr. Sills, in his colourless voice and with the
manner he must use in his missionary societies and meetings
of stewards in his church, read a long list of names. It was a
list of men who, according to Mr. Sills, might be depended
upon to support the purposes and ideals of the Association of
Growers of Dark Fired Tobacco. "Which purposes and
ideals," Mr. Christian had interrupted Mr. Sills before the
list began, " is to make those son-of-a-bitching buyers pay me
what my tobacco's worth,"

At that, someone had laughed, and Mr. Munn, in the midst
of his own smile, had suddenly seen again in his mind the
rapt and distant expression Mr. Christian's face had worn
when he first looked from the window of the hotel room over
the heads of the crowd in the street.

But after the laughter stopped, Mr. Sills, clearing his throat
slightly, repeated with his colourless equanimity, "... to
support the purposes and ideals of the Association of Growers
of Dark Fired Tobacco," and began to read the list.

The names proceeded. Mr. Munn listened idly to them.
There were a great many names, and many of them now
already were checked off as promised supporters. He had not
thought that matters had gone quite so far. The Association
might, after all, come to something at this rate. He tried to
study the faces of the men at the table between him and the
light, ordinary faces and ordinary men, on the whole, men
whom he had known*all his life, or like men he had known.
Then it occurred to him that behind all the names he was
hearing without attention were other men, scattered over the
section, in other counties, perfectly real men, all different
from each other in their own ways, but drawn together by
the fact that their names were on the pieces of paper which
Mr. Sills held. From that paper invisible threads, as it were,
stretched off to Hunter County and Caldwell County and